What is martial arts therapy?

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What is martial arts therapy?

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Photo credit to www.abilities.com/

Photo credit to abilities.com

What is martial arts therapy?

Most people think of martial arts as a competitive sport that involves combat, but it's also used to heal the body and mind. Martial arts therapy can work for all sorts of ailments, from reducing aggression to helping with balance or alleviating the symptoms of mental disorders. The goal of this unique therapy isn't to become masterful at the sport -- if you want to win big, you can play exciting new games at 7 Sultans online casino. Instead, it provides an alternative for those who either want something outside of traditional medicine and those who haven't responded to conventional therapy or medications well. Here's more information about martial arts therapy and how it's used.

So, what is it?

Photo credit to Dayton Children's Hospital

Photo credit to Dayton Children's Hospital

Martial arts therapy doesn't have to be administered in a clinical setting, and it rarely ever is. Instructors also don't need to be clinicians, psychologists, or doctors, although some just happen to be martial arts therapy providers. Any time that someone uses a form of martial arts to help relieve a physical or mental issue, it might be called martial arts therapy.

One important thing that distinguishes it from regular martial arts classes and competitive forms of the sport is that it takes into account a person's mental and physical well-being and social development. Due to its growing popularity there are now organizations for those who want to help others through teaching martial arts, as well as communities geared towards people who are looking to learn it for their own health.

Martial arts has been used for centuries to help people overcome various mental issues, such as depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and self-confidence, and aggression. Some forms have also been employed to relieve physical illnesses like arthritis and joint paint, but it's within the last two decades that attempts have been made to clearly define what sets martial arts therapy apart from regular classes and martial arts practiced purely for sport or combat.

Does it work?

Photo credit to NYMetroParents.com

Photo credit to NYMetroParents.com

Taking a chance on martial arts therapy isn't like betting on games at 7 Sultans casino, as it's actually been proven to work well for many people. When used to help those who have endured psychological trauma or people who have psychosocial ailments, martial arts therapy can provide a way to gain perspective, learn self-control, and deal with anger. Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder have also benefited from martial arts therapy, particularly Aikido. For instance, someone who has PTSD after being assaulted may opt to regain their self-confidence and also find peace of mind from learning self-defense through martial arts rather than taking medications for anxiety.

It's been found that those who have problems with balance, including young children, the elderly, and those who have been physically injured, can improve their condition with martial arts forms such as Tai Chi and Qi Gong. As these forms are gentle, aren't meant to put stress on the body, and involve improving balance, flexibility, and muscle strength, they've worked wonders for a number of people seeking alternative and complementary therapies.

Some researchers feel that the jury is still out on just how effective martial arts therapy is for different types of populations, but for those whose lives it has helped there's little doubt about the world of good that it can do. It's especially effective for those who are seeking true lifestyle changes as opposed to quick fixes.

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